Politics / Press Releases

Ageists Beware; the Older Generation is Making a New Year’s Resolution to Play a New Role in 2017 and Beyond, says AMAC

‘The world belongs to the young at heart’

WASHINGTON, DC, Jan 6 – Big changes are in store for America’s older citizens in 2017 and beyond, says Dan Weber, president of the Association of Mature American Citizens.

“It used to be that the world belonged to the young when in fact it has always belonged to the young at heart.  And, with more people living longer than ever before, the older generations have an opportunity to show our worth.  The stereotypes of the past are slowly but surely giving way to a new way to look at the so-called ‘older generation’ as more and more of us embrace active retirements and even the establishment of new business careers.” according Weber.

Recently, the Milken Institute’s Center for the Future of Aging shed light on the importance of recognizing the nation’s aging population as an invaluable asset.  At a summit convened to stress the importance of the contribution the older population can make in the nation’s future, participants focused on the need for “reframing perceptions of aging in the 21st century.”

Among their conclusions:  we must change our perceptions of growing old.  A report issued at the conclusion of the Milken summit stated that: “Today it is socially unacceptable to ignore, ridicule, or stereotype someone based on their gender, race, or sexual orientation.  So why is it still acceptable to do this to people based on their age?  Ageism creates a negative reality of aging.  It’s bad enough that ageism can influence public policy, employment practices, and how people are treated in society, but what’s worse is that we accept the ageist behavior ourselves and start acting it out.  Older people are as multidimensional as any other group in our society.  We need to show the multidimensionality of their passion.”

The Census Bureau estimates that America’s population aged 65 and over will be nearly 84 million people or nearly 20% of the nation’s expected population.

“What’s more important,” says Dan Weber, “is the fact that the majority of them will be active citizens, playing a transformative role in society.  The miracles of modern medicine will contribute to the ‘new look’ of old age, but it will be the self-determination that we express today that will make the difference.  There’s a lot of knowledge we carry around in our old brains and it is time to put that knowledge to good use by becoming role models and mentors.  It’s a New Year’s resolution befitting the knowledge we have amassed over the years.”

ABOUT AMAC

The Association of Mature American Citizens [http://www.amac.us] is a vibrant, vital senior advocacy organization that takes its marching orders from its members.  We act and speak on their behalf, protecting their interests and offering a practical insight on how to best solve the problems they face today.  Live long and make a difference by joining us today at http://amac.us/join-amac.

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Mary Tremblay
4 years ago

This is good news

Jim
4 years ago

I will be 70 in March. Hard to believe, where did 50 years go. I had a decent career but a lousy retirement plan. Retail is very competitive job and most of my employers ended up going out of business. I am still working, driving a truck overnight as an independent contractor. It’s a job that does not worry to much about age. I have 2 daughters still living at home and am divorced. I am not bitter about my situation, but feel it is keeping me out there and young. It’s good there is a chance they may look at the baby boom generation in a new light with our numbers. They need to. Our generation has gone through much change and they need us more than ever to lend guidance in fixing what has gone down hill. Respect of others and their opinions, love of family and fellow man, honesty, integrity and what ever your faith guides you to benefit mankind. My mother will be 97 in a couple months, I can only hope I have that much time left to contribute what I can to righting the ship. Our days and our country’s days ahead can be the best and brightest ever.

Anita G. Johnson
4 years ago

I “retired” in 2008 due to family obligations. My mother could no longer stay alone all week while I was gone, so I did what I was supposed to, and wanted to, do. I took care of her until she passed away 4 years ago. In 2016, at age 71, I returned to my previous occupation. I am an over-the-road truck driver. I quickly realized that I don’t do retirement very well.

Ronald Dodd
4 years ago

I “retired” at age 65. Found out that SS alone does not keep pace with inflation. At 77, I thought I was too old…nobody wants to hire me! Made application online with Walmart the early part of October. Within three days, I got a call for an interview…next day I was hired and into job orientation. I am now a proud “Walmart Associate” working in Assembly where my primary job is assembling bikes, but we (myself and my partner, Charles Gregory) also assemble displays. I just love it! We are back in a corner with seperate work benches and our own tools (supplied by Walmart). There is a lot of turnover…mainly the younger crowd. Many cannot pass the drug tests. Others, the background test. And others were just looking for an easy paycheck. Starting hourly wage is $9.00. I think it is an excellent start for young and old. You can build work and managerial skills there and move onto something better or bigger. Some Associates have made a career of Walmart and are celebrating their 50 + years. I be done. Ye Olde Road Warrior…Ron Dodd

PaulE
4 years ago
Reply to  Ronald Dodd

Good for you Ronald. You found that SS isn’t the financial panacea many thought it would be for retirement and then you went out and did something to bolster your finances in order to address the issue. You took proactive action to address the problem and also found something you like doing as well. Well done.

Ivan Berry
4 years ago
Reply to  Ronald Dodd

Some might call it luck. Well, you seem to have made your own luck, Mr. Dodd.

Richard V.
4 years ago
Reply to  Ronald Dodd

And just to complete the thought, military retired pay doesn’t keep up with inflation, either. Hence my two “hobby jobs” to keep everything in the black while maintaining a non-extravagant lifestyle in “retirement.”

ed
4 years ago

the site says go to read about planned parenthood . you go and its not there. needs improvement

Frances Barwick
4 years ago
Reply to  ed

Ed, I found it & I m 81 yrs of age! so try again :)

Rik
4 years ago

Well, now that I’M a senior, I have to admit that I certainly know a heck of a lot more in terms of Living Life than our young people. But then again, when it comes to computer and smart phone knowledge, the young people CERTAINLY KNOW more than the majority of us seniors. But now that I am forced to continue to having to work by financial necessity, I am having to learn more about smart technology. Listen people, this technology IS changing the way ALL people live. Many jobs are going to be eliminated. Robots WILL begin to replace people on ANY assembly line, email is eliminating the need for a post office.
Print media is going the way of the dinosaur, it’s going to be extinct, and any jobs in print media, mine included, are now gone. I’ve seen predictions that in as soon as 2020, half the employment in this country will be in home based businesses. This is all being driven by labor costs, insurance costs, housing costs, etc, etc. A $15 minimum wage is ridiculous, but necessary, in order to survive today in any metro area. But, and this is a HUGE BUT, small businesses can’t afford or survive paying these types of wages. How can ANY fast food or restaurant afford to pay servers and food preparation people $15 an hour? How does ANY retail business pay cashiers and stock workers $15 an hour? And in doing so, the cost of food and any goods and services WILL reflect higher prices. The result is that many people and ESPECIALLY seniors, will be forced to move into rural areas just to survive. I predict that many seniors will be forced to have to live with and in their children’s homes or will need to band together in communual relationships just to survive. One thing I have discovered, 90% of seniors that go to senior centers are low income, most surviving on JUST their Social Security. What’s the solution? We will ALL have to continue working to just survive, forget about ever retiring to a life of leisure for the majority of the population. But one thing I do know, the answer is DEFINITELY NOT Democratic Socialism in disguise of Communism.
We seniors, MUST FIGHT to preserve Capitalism or future generations of Americans will be doomed to servitude to Big Business AND Big Government!!!

PaulE
4 years ago
Reply to  Rik

Very well said Rik. I wasn’t going to bother commenting on the article itself, as it just references yet another paid for study that repeats the same conclusions. None of which are new or surprising and that I’ve read elsewhere literally dozens of times over the last 10 to 15 years. However, if I may, I would like to comment on a few points you mentioned. Before retiring, I worked in the technology and financial industries from a global perspective. So I know quite a bit about the long-term trends and impacts that various policies you mentioned will have on various industries and society as a whole.

1) Technology has and will continue to re-shape all aspects of society going forward. You are correct that everyone, including seniors, has to stay current with how to use technology or they will become unemployable. Anyone out there that thinks the world is going to go back to the 1940’s or 1950’s when someone with a high school diploma could earn a decent living working on an assembly line tightening bolts or stacking shelves is fooling themselves. That is already mostly automated. Just look on You Tube to see how the average car is built or how modern fulfillment centers operate. It’s all robotics. The jobs of the future in the automotive sector will be in robotic maintenance and repair along with programming. The same holds true for every other industry where robotics and automation are playing ever-larger roles. Today cars, planes, ships, weapons systems, rockets, etc. are all designed via CAD / CAM systems as opposed to the old methods or creating in the case of automobiles clay models, one-off proto-types, etc. Precision machine parts are all turned out via computerized systems, which require operators with good math skills to program and operate. Those are all high skilled jobs that pay well above the much discussed $15 minimum wage. My point is that the nature of what constitutes a job in manufacturing, shipping and many other industries is constantly changing. One has to be prepared to adapt to those changes or become unemployable. In the technology industry, the average lifespan for most software products is now down to about six months before it becomes obsolete by something new. By the way, this is NOT a new issue. At the beginning of the 20th century, people in employed in the saddle, buggy whips and delivery wagon trades had to adapt to the introduction of the motorized vehicle which rendered their jobs obsolete. The same held true when the beginning of the industrial age allowed for manufacturing of all sorts of things on a mass scale with uniform quality and consistency. It is no different today. Technology is constantly re-making the economic landscape.

2) As to the $15 minimum wage Democrats have been pushing so hard for, I suggest you look at what that has done to the restaurant and retail business industries in states that have already embraced it. Basically the restaurant and retail business owners either have had to cut back on the number of employees they have or they have to close their doors. The public in these states has already shown that they will NOT accept the type of price increases necessary to offset the higher mandated minimum wages. Many of the national brand fast food companies (McDonalds, Burger King, Wendy’s, etc.) are now looking at ways to automate part or all of the food preparation process in their stores, as the higher minimum wage actually makes robotics a more economical solution than employing a person. Fast food restaurants that had a crew of 6 to 10 behind the counter may soon be down to four or five. Retail store chains are actively planning to scale back the number of stores, that means close stores (Walmart, Sears, K-Mart, Macy’s, etc.), they have in operation to offset the higher wage cost. So the net effect is fewer jobs for either the young person just getting into the work force or the older person with the least amount of skills. Thus hurting the people that, once again, the Democrats (Socialists0 claim they seek to help and which will actually result in higher unemployment and the need for higher taxes to support more people unable to find employment. Democrats love this result, because it creates a larger dependent class. Which is their core constituency. For the rest of us, all the $15 minimum wage simply represents is a larger tax bill and even more people unable to find work.

3) With Jerry Brown and the Democrat-controlled state legislature you have in California spending ever-larger amounts of money they don’t have and with fewer options from which to raise more to waste on their progressive pipe dreams, your cost of living has to already have gone through the roof. In many ways. California is indicative of what all deep blue states will be facing in a few more short years. It’s a great example of what in-restrained socialism (I know Brown and the California Dems calls themselves Progressives) can do to a once vibrant and growing state economy and its people. Massive wasteful spending on virtually every social welfare program or cause they can dream up, with a Socialist’s zealot belief that they will never run out of other peoples’ money to spend in their quest to create a socialist Utopia on earth. I know in my blue state of New Jersey, that the Democrats are just salivating for which one of the spend-happy Democrat clowns will take over after Christy in 2018 and drive the state back into the economic toilet is was in under the previous string of Democrat Governors. Cuomo in New York state is already frantically trying to be more progressive than Jerry Brown as he eyes a possible run for the White House in 2020 and leaves New York state buried under a mountain of debt.

As to your conclusion, you have it exactly right. We have to spend a lot of time trying to re-educate the younger generations as to the flaws of socialism and benefits of capitalism. Most of the millennials actually view socialism as being preferable to capitalism, because that is what their socialist teachers and professors have pounded into their heads throughout their formal education years. We have to try and undo that damage the best we can or this nation will go the way of other countries that have adopted socialism. That means having conversations with young people. Don’t lecture them, but instead talk to them. There is a big difference between the two. Try and explain, in terms they can relate to, why what they have been indoctrinated to accept regarding socialism and its supposed benefits isn’t what socialism actually delivers. We can’t simply spend our time conversing with other like-minded seniors, who already understand that what the Socialists propose won’t deliver the results they promise. Too many seniors only talk to other seniors, who already know that socialism / communism doesn’t work and will only destroy the country. That is like a history teacher teaching to a room full of other history teachers. Nothing is actually accomplished, as they all already know the same facts being discussed.

Anyway, again good comments Rik. Far better than the article itself.

Ivan Berry
4 years ago
Reply to  Rik

Rik, as PaulE indicated, yes, much better than the pap article itself. Very well described as to the situation, and by inclusion of PaulE’s comments, so well over the top of anything AMAC has been able to produce.
You two have made the subject worthwhile and not a waste of time as was the survey of the Milken study.
Makes one wonder what criteria is used in selecting articles to post each week.
Oh, and me and mine are already in a rural area, and so far surviving quite well. There’s a lot of land in Texas and very little confiscated by the Federals (see: the western states).
And boy were you two long winded. But a good read. Keep it up.

Rik
4 years ago
Reply to  Ivan Berry

Hi Ivan, of course I’m long winded, I’ve been in sales for 45 years and PaulE’s comments are ALWAYS worth reading no matter the length.

PaulE
4 years ago
Reply to  Ivan Berry

Hi Ivan,

I think flipping a coin is the selection criteria for what articles get selected each week.

Yeah I read about Obama’s parting shot to seize all that land. Completely disgraceful and NOT what the law was designed for. It was designed to protect a specific single structure, man-made or natural, within a limited area. Grabbing 1.3 million acres, in one case, to protect some limited sites with ancient drawings is just Obama flipping the finger to some western states. A class act right to the end.

Ivan Berry
4 years ago
Reply to  PaulE

Yes, and that coin must either be of potmetal or lead: It so often flops.
Maybe next week will be better and more interesting. Its about time, don’t you think?

PaulE
4 years ago
Reply to  Ivan Berry

Yes. One would hope that AMAC would actually run more compelling articles covering a broader range of topics. There are certainly enough of them being written each week from a multitude of sources. Given the dwindling number of respondents with each passing week, to the largely repetitive articles, AMAC needs to broaden its perspective of what constitutes issues of interest to so-called seniors. Of course it would also help if they revised their so-called solutions to Obamacare, SS, etc. to actually reflect the conservative values they claim to support. Not holding my breath of that one though.

kay
4 years ago
Reply to  Ivan Berry

Well, you three respondants I just read brought about 1) a lifting in my heart…near to Donald Trump presidency; 2) confirmation where I find myself is awesome…in everywhere I walk… not perfect yet, but smileable; 3) my far-from-perfect children and families were led/are being shown paths that won’t leave them empty/distraught/spinning helplessly. 4)my losses are ‘light to their paths/wisdom/smarts/insights’… allowing my Talents/Gifts to flow freely. **Reading/Listening to others way deeper than what ‘deplorable/unredeemable’ describes. Thank you for this forum… I’m swimming with you.

John S. Eckersley
4 years ago
Reply to  Rik

Surely you mean: “Communism disguised as Democratic Socialism!!! ???

Scottar
4 years ago
Reply to  Rik

These days I think we have more millennials living in their parents home with the highest non participating labor levels ever since the great depression.

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