Press Releases / Social Security

AMAC: ‘We Want a Social Security Guarantee’

social securityby John Grimaldi – A real and dedicated solution for fixing Social Security is needed –

WASHINGTON, DC, Jan 24 – More Americans are reaching age 100 than ever before and that’s all the more reason for a renewed focus on Social Security, according to seniors advocate Dan Weber.  “These days one in 6,000 of us make it to the century mark while just 50 years ago only one in 67,000 lived that long.”

The president of the Association of Mature American Citizens was joined last week at a news conference here by Hall of Famer Fran Tarkenton to announce a new endeavor to get lawmakers on the Hill to ensure the long-term viability of Social Security.  Tarkenton said that he joined the AMAC Board of Advisors because the association seeks to “get stuff done” and ensuring the future of Social Security “needs to get done.”

In an interview after the news conference, Weber said that he, Tarkenton and the AMAC team “want a Social Security Guarantee for this generation and for future generations.  It’s not an entitlement handout, as many would suggest; it’s an annuity they paid for all their working lives, a retirement fund that was supposed to be backed by the full faith and credit of the United States.  But the government now says it may not have enough money to sustain the program for very long. The Trustee’s report says everyone’s benefits will be cut by 25% in the future unless we act now.   And, that’s not good news for a population that is living longer than expected.”

He cited U.S. Census data showing that an American born at the turn of the last century had a life expectancy of just 55 1/2 years, but that millennium kids born in 2001 can expect to live to an average ripe old age of 80-plus years.  And, he noted, people celebrating birthdays in their 90’s is up about 30%.

“Many of them might be frail, but a goodly number of them are living active lives like U.S. Navy Captain (Ret) Jack Slaughter who celebrated his 100th birthday at a gala event in Baltimore a few days ago.  At his side was his wife of 75 years, Bess, who is 97 years old.  They held their own during the festivities.”

Weber said “for many elderly Americans, Social Security is what puts food on their tables.  It’s their principal source of income, meager as it might be, and they would face cruel hardships if they their monthly checks were cut.”

He noted that there are numerous notions floating around Capitol Hill.  Some say Social Security doesn’t need fixing.  This despite the fact that the experts clearly warn that it does.

In fact, the Social Security Administration states flatly on its Web site that: “legislative changes are necessary to avoid disruptive consequences for beneficiaries and taxpayers. If lawmakers take action sooner rather than later, more options and more time will be available to phase in changes so that the public has adequate time to prepare. Earlier action will also help elected officials minimize adverse impacts on vulnerable populations, including lower-income workers and people already dependent on program benefits.”

Weber said that he’s “riled” by the attempts of some lawmakers to ignore the facts and those who seek to “obfuscate” the issue by suggesting solutions such as immigration reform on the theory that providing a pathway to citizenship will mean new workers and new funding.

“What we need is a real and dedicated solution for fixing Social Security, not pie-in-the-sky theories,” Weber said.  “And that solution is a simple three-part reform that includes fair and balanced age setbacks for future recipients, guaranteed minimum cost of living increases and a provision for a new personal Early Retirement Account (ERA).”

NOTE TO EDITORS: Dan Weber is available for telephone interviews on this issue.  Editors and reporters may contact John Grimaldi by phone at 917-846-8485 or via email at [email protected] to set up a call.

ABOUT AMAC

The Association of Mature American Citizens [http://www.amac.us] is a vibrant, vital and conservative alternative to those organizations, such as AARP, that dominate the choices for mature Americans who want a say in the future of the nation.  Where those other organizations may boast of their power to set the agendas for their memberships, AMAC takes its marching orders from its members.  We act and speak on their behalf, protecting their interests, and offering a conservative insight on how to best solve the problems they face today.  Live long and make a difference by joining us today at http://amac.us/join-amac.

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Ken
7 years ago

I think an option is to take OASDI for the entire year from everyone (most lower paid individuals already do this). It would mostly hit the higher paid individuals but it would bring in more money. I was a computer guy. I’ve seen folks hit the max amount in February and then not pay anymore for the rest of the year.

charles williams
7 years ago

I hope that this will becom law in the near future.

Trish
7 years ago

WHY are the people who are voted in office NOT be held accountab;e when the wishes of the people are trashed in favor of some big “bonus”. Why are there not term limits and penalties for poor representation of the people who put them there? Why is there no huge outrage by seniors that both government and their media continue to lump social security in the same “goodie bag” as entitlements? How do we do something other than vote to redo immigration laws and enforce border security at all 4 b orders-voting is good but too seldom for some things and too often the “gimmees” are paid to stuff the ballot boxes.It is aggravating as all get out that we can’t enforce the USA is English speaking and if they can’t understand then learn or go back where they came from. Sooooo tired of seeing big black Cadillac Escalades with 10 kids unbelted in handicapped marked spaces using EBT or SNAP to pay for things or even get cash.
We all talk a lot but actions speak louder than words-HOW DO WE GET ‘ER DUN???????

John
7 years ago

Take a good look at yourself and ask the question, After all these years ‘Have I made peace with God, do I simply BELIEVE JESUS?” More important than SS folks. Love you all!

JudyG46
7 years ago

There wouldn’t be such a problem if only the government had kept our SS payments in a separate fund for those who contributed and planned to use those funds at retirement.

Had they done what they should have, we’d be collecting more than we do now, and there would be safety for those in the future who contributed.

Shame on our government confiscating those funds and using them for other things.

solojazzguitar
7 years ago
Reply to  JudyG46

Social Security? As long as men and government are involved with your wealth, you will never have security.

Trish
7 years ago
Reply to  JudyG46

I agree totally that SS funds should have been kept separate but, obviously, they were not and now we are the ones paying the price of government greed and folly. BUT-do you really thing any of the fat cats in Washington give a rats butt??? They are in office way too long by stuffing ballot boxes and paying people off . I think every person in Senate, Congress, Supreme Court, DOJ and President and staff should have to do regulatuion military service and live at least one year on basic social security but NOooooooo-there they go, padding already rich pockets to get in office with little or no real knowledge or care about others. Just think how much money is required to even get on the ballotlet alone what they scam once they get in and stay in office for years. Our problem as seniors is that WE HAVE NO REAL VOICE LOUD ENOUGH TO GET ANY REAL ATTENTION. We need some real fight ammo making lots of noise. Too many like that guy head of GOP with weird name nobody ever hears about. Too many Good Old Boys content in their recliners and not enough out there making noise. .

Bill
7 years ago

I would like to see us all get paid what we and our employers put into SS and that’s it. We cannot afford the Ponzi scheme of Social Security.

Ron Regar
7 years ago
Reply to  Bill

Bill’s comment doesn’t take into account that the funds we and our employers paid in itself wouldn’t begin to provide for those receiving social security. Perhaps Bill should have accounted for inflation or perhaps how much our payments would have grown at an average annual rate of return on some index.

Sure we get annual increases on our social security checks based on inflation but its at some under calculated rate of inflation. We all know that over the past several years these social security inflation increases haven’t come close to actual annual inflation – not even close.

Gary Ross
7 years ago

The federal government employs the best and the brightest minds that money can buy, and they didn’t see this coming? That makes me feel brighter than Einstein, because I did see it coming back in the 70’s when they were talking about what to do with all this excess SS money. They should have invested it, which would have strengthened the economy and had the program set for the future. Or they could have been a world lender for other countries instead of running up trillions in our national debt. But they didn’t do anything like that. Instead they stole from it to pay for pet political projects and gave it away to those who have no vested interest in the program. Well, they better make good on this contract with American citizens who worked and paid all our lives for this and Medicare by enacting their laws. This is a nation of laws, and if we allow our government to break them with free will, then we aren’t much of a nation! All those who died for our freedome have died in vein. Return all money that was taken from these programs immediately and with interest, and prosecute those who are doing wrong, starting with obama. Let me know when the televised linchings on the steps of the White House take place.

Ron Hirschkind
7 years ago

Anyone who wants to get a true picture of America, should visit a social security office. The vast majority waiting to be served are not seniors. Many barely speak English. There is a war going on but NOT against women. It is being waged against seniors and one weapon against us IS social security. The longer we live the more of a burden seniors are being portrayed as being. For the most part, we’ve paid into the system and are deserving of our benefits.These are not”entitlements” as many would have the ignorant and uninformed believe. You work, you pay in, you retire, you get your money.Not everyone is fortunate enough to have made alot of money, invested well , remained healthy,or inherited well. Expecting everyone working to be able to invest wisely to have a bundle in their later years is an unreasonable proposition. Our rising prices and overall cost of living increases makes it difficult to make it on social security. For most, doing that puts them into the poverty income level as defined by our government.Not a good thing.
The government taxes social security income and that is absolutely outrageous. There are no quick fixes to this problem or most of the others facing our country today. One thing is for certain. Our president is a dictator wannabe.A socialist at best or perhaps much worse. It is absolutely imperative that seniors vote Republican in the next elections.
It has nothing to do with individual beliefs or ideals. but rather the actual survival of our nation as we once knew and loved it. It also is a must for seniors if WE want to live out our “golden” as golden years or “tin” years”

KarenFaye
7 years ago
Reply to  Ron Hirschkind

Ron, you are so right!! On my last visit to SSI the hair on my neck bristled each time a rep came out and said IN SPANISH, the number of the next person waiting. It happened at least 8 times in the hour I was there!! What the heck???? And, then there are the ones who are on disability — for headaches, diabetes, Nervousness, Anxiety, Carpal Tunnel syndrome (also easily fixed); Backaches, and the many other trumped up reasons the Obama Government gives away the Senior’s money to these pikers. I would be willing to bet my life that maybe 1 in 12 are truly eligible for benefits -and the rest just find doctors who will easily sign off. These people play pool, go hunting, fishing, bowling, skiing, do yardwork, gardening, bicycling, and other “actitivities” but they supposedly are too feeble and in pain to work!!!! Where is the accountability? Why doesn’t the IRS spend some time investigating them? Unending unemployment benefits? Why work? Why even look??? Easy access EBT cards? Free Phones? Why try to better yourself or your income? You’ll lose Uncle Sam’s gravy benefits…….. Obama knows exactly what he’s doing. He has no use for the older generation (because most of us vote republican) – and the more he can make dependent on Uncle – the more he knows will vote Democrat so as not to lose their lifestyle of “Gimme, Gimme, and Gimme MORE”. Jerry D had the same experience – and we all know someone personally who collects SSDI and SHOULDN’T. Too bad nobody in charge cares!!

Stan
7 years ago

The only avenue open for repair of the Social Security System is to design a new plan for the younger folks while maintaining and guaranteeing the current plan for those already on it.

Kathy
7 years ago
Reply to  Stan

I agree with Stan. We absolutely need to phase out Social Security (SS) as a government program. New, private sector plans should immediately start being offered for anyone of any age who wants to begin them and opt out of SS payroll deductions. The individual knows what is best for him (her).

Those who already receive benefits or elect to stay in SS because they are too close to retirement and have paid in all their working lives, should have their benefits continue with benefit payments that keep up with inflation.

Critics will ask, “Where will we get the money to continue SS benefits for the older workers and current retirees if we don’t take payroll deductions from everyone.” The answer is, The same place the money will come from if the SS system goes broke in a few years–the taxpayer.” Does that sound harsh? My opinion is that the federal government currently wastes enough money each year to fund those who need to stay in the SS system until all are phased out.

Do those under 65 understand the limitations that are put on them as SS recipients? Here are a few effects that come to my mind from my own experiences:
a. the government decides how much you need to live on, not you
b. your benefit amount can be raised or lowered without any consent from you
c. the government can “borrow” from the SS trust fund for other government programs
d. after you have paid in all your life, the government can decide that you have too much money and severely reduce your benefits (this is already being discussed!)

What would be the benefit of having a private plan?
a. You can compare available retirement plans, including saving your own money. (Think how much interest you could have earned on your own–More than the government is currently giving back to seniors now!)
b. Wouldn’t it be nice to have access to all that money you paid into SS if you got very sick and had huge medical bills (don’t get me started on Medicare!)
c. What if you find out you are terminally ill shortly after qualifying for SS benefits? SS doesn’t give all that money you had deducted from 45 years of paychecks to you to pass on to your family.

In other words, for precious little “security”, the government is running your life!

Ron Hirschkind
6 years ago
Reply to  Stan

There are several things we can do easily to improve social security. One is to boot all those here illegally out of the country. The circumstance doesn’t matter. The Law is the Law. Second, instead of giving us pitiful increases, stop taxing social security. Social Security was never meant to be taxed.It amounts to double taxation.There should be no salary cap for payments into the system. The more you earn, the more you pay in and the more you take in at the end.

Jerry D
7 years ago

There is one other huge problem with the SS system that I don’t see anybody talking about.

When I turned 66 years old a couple years ago I went to the Social Security Office to sign up for my benefits. I expected to see a bunch of grey hairs like me.

I walked into a large room with service windows on the far side. The first thing I noticed was the armed guard near the entrance issuing numbers for service. There was a large screen TV on the front wall describing all the benefits available, the descriptions were in English and Spanish.

My number was some 40 places back in line so I stepped to the back of the room and observed what was happening. I spent about 1 and 1/2 hours there.

There were chairs lined up in rows facing the TV, so I looked at all the people in the room. I counted about 68 people there. There were only three others who appeared to be older that 60 years. There was also one man in a wheel chair who was in his 40’s and obviously disabled. The rest were young men and women who appeared to be less than forty years old. I listened as people went to the window for service to see why these young people were in the Social Security Office.

They were all there to collect their SSDI benefits because they were claiming some type of condition that prevents them from working.

It appears Social Security has turned into another welfare program for those who do not want to work and are not paying in. If this cross section of the population I observed holds true around the Country there is no hope for it to survive under these conditions.

Andrew Crouch
7 years ago
Reply to  Jerry D

My son is a recipient of SSI. I don’t deny him his due, because he did come into this world with a brain injury. Legally he is referred to as being of “special needs.” His future has been provided for through a Living Trust and ultimately a Special Needs Trust (SNT).
However, it was not long after I began receiving my Social Security benefits when we were notified that my son would also begin receiving a benefit, calculated on the basis of what I am receiving as a retirement benefit. His SSI benefits were reduced virtually dollar for dollar. Actually, between the two now, he is receiving just slightly more than his original SSI benefit.
My issue is with the benefit allocation. Why can’t I receive a greater Social Security retirement, while he continues to receive his original SSI benefit? In real dollars, the difference is a “wash.” It seems as hard as those within system have worked at determining benefits, the system has evolved to be somewhat convoluted.

Fred Loe
7 years ago

The main problem with social insecurity is we were never given the choice to put into it an now the solution is to Mean’s Test(what a joke!) you own your own business and pay twice the social security as owner and recipient then some politician says you get less of a benefit because you saved and made a profit plus you get to pay lots of taxes.Same thing with George Bush’s having people that earn more(that means works harder and smarter) and longer so we get to pay more for the same Medicare part B than everyone else pays who did not make a financial success.This is a form of blatant discrimination and I am tired of being called rich,mean spirited and callous.If only 47% are paying any federal tax and I am privileged to pay lots is it my fault I and my wife both have worked and saved and loved our work so someone else can tell me what to do with MY MONEY!Other countries of the world treat senior’s better at less cost and they are open to people bringing their hard cash and residing in them with less money.I am not optimistic for the middle class of this country and see european socialism on the face of all politicians of all stripes.I am not whining but I am darn mad at working for the other 53%.Other peoples money not their money.More millionaires created in the 1990’s then ever ,new ones not old money and most did not come from government program.My father law told me when you give your monies to govt they are incapable of taking care of is well as you,Period forget about fraud the biggest fraud is our government local,state and Fed the next biggest is healthcare administration by insurance co and govt working in tandem.Phooee

Don Messer
7 years ago

I agree that this is a retirement fund. If the government paid ST back that was stolen from it, we wouldn’t have a found running out of money.

evans winter
7 years ago

You will not get a guaranteed payoff from the present system because it is a Ponzi scheme pure and simple. We now have fewer workers supporting more retirees, and everyone seems to expect salvation by decree—continued benefits (inflated over time) derived from politically unpopular base contribution levels (input) that always lag levels needed to sustain the promised benefits. The The entire economist/politician generated inflation/gross domestic product model is a sham, anyway—-buying power does not necessarily track the politically inspired rate of “inflation” and the assumed relationship of past and present units of production is based on a faulty premise that “production” (whatever that is) is produced by man-hours of labor—which it no longer is in this machine and information age.—- Ah, the woes of the economist, who does the best he can with the inadequate tools he has to work with. I learned as a sophomore to stay away from that field of endeavor.

The only way to “fix” the Social Security system is to scrap it (while maintaining the current promised benefit plan for retirees and vested workers) and start a new program for current workers.

Jackie Youkers
7 years ago
Reply to  evans winter

You are so right, Evans, but sad thing it’ll NEVER happen.

Meathead
7 years ago

SS is going to be hard to reestablish as a positive account. We currently have $127.592 Trillion in “Unfunded Liabilities” under SS, Medicare and Prescription Drug liabilities.
http://www.usdebtclock.org/

For reference:
$1 Trillion in $100 bills weighs 11,000 TONS. You do the math on our $17.353 Trillion debt and the above “Unfunded Liability” amount. BTW, there is an additional $5.1 Trillion debt that is “off balance sheet” and not reported.

Diana
7 years ago

I have jjust joined AMAC and am very glad I did. AARP’s lobbying power will soon be eclipsed by ours.Everyone’s being slammed by Obamacare etc.and I’ll chip in all I can to reverse America’s decline. Maybe not much, but all I can afford.

John Dickey
7 years ago

One way to save Social Security is to put it in an interest bearing account, and the only ones who can draw from it are the ones who paid into it. That is how it should have been done when it was set up. It was a Ponzi scheme from the beginning so the politicians would have more money to spend. There are illegals getting a bigger Social Security check each month than I am, and I paid into it all of my working life.

George Bush tried to let people put 10% of their SS money into a private account, but the democrats wouldn’t allow that. If people who first start working could put 10% of their SS money into a private account, they would have much more coming to them in retirement than from the 90% SS. It is a ripoff the incumbents don’t want to give up. The only way it will change is to get rid of All incumbents, and put in new.

Eventually, SS needs to be replaced with an IRA people pay into and can’t draw from until a certain age (50 for example). Clark Howard said that if a 15 year old could put $2,000 per year in a Wroth IRA for just 7 years, and leave it there until age 65, and the stock averages what it has from its beginning, there would be $1,000,000 in the account. That is from just a $14,000 investment. If you could have put ALL of your SS in a Wroth IRA from the beginning, how much would you have now? Enough to take care of your retirement, and medical bills.

Ivan Berry
7 years ago
Reply to  John Dickey

That 14000 by historical indications would require somewhere in the area of 138000 to match in todays dollars. As far as stock averages, the weaker companies are no longer in the composit. What index was used? And what 15 yr old is able to put back 2000 a year when jobs are absent? I don’t see how that could actually work unless the stock operative was an investment genius. Anyway, they’ll probably raid the IRA’s before they are done with us, unless the euthanize us with Obamacare first.

Meathead
7 years ago
Reply to  Ivan Berry

Ivan, use the “Rule of 72” and figure it out. 72 divided by the interest rate equals the number of years it takes the money to double.
If, at age 25, you put $2,000 into an average growth fund for 7 years and left it there until age 60, you would have $1,182,000 which would provide you with about a little over $8,000 per month (interest and principle) until age 100.
People simply do not understand the power of compound interest. It’s not how much, it’s how long.

Meathead
7 years ago
Reply to  John Dickey

Hate to tell ya, but the account is empty. Congress “borrows” the SS funds and issues “Special Bonds” to the account. These “Special Bonds” are “redeemable upon demand”. If these bonds were to be redeemed, it would put a severe strain on the dollar’s market value and produce high inflation. Ain’t gonna happen any time soon.

Eddie Boettcher
7 years ago
Reply to  John Dickey

John when SS was started it was set that way but not no more.

Steve Hendricks
7 years ago
Reply to  John Dickey

John D.

Those are all good thoughts/numbers. I suppose they are all accurate, but if you spell it Roth your credibility will be improved.

Jan
7 years ago

Fixing Social Security sounds good and is necessary BUT where does the money come from?

Connie Auran
7 years ago

My question of the day is: My husband lost a leg in Korea, then returned home, got a college degree and worked his fanning off for 40 years and paid into SS all that time. The only tine he even asked the VA for help was when he needed a new leg because they had the best that was available I cannot collect any of his SS because that would be double dipping I am told. I paid into SS all through high school and college with part time jobs. I am told I do not have enough hours to collect on my own and cannot collect on Walt’s SS.I am told this would be double dipping because I belonged to Pera ,a state Program while I worked for 20 years and now collect a small sum from them in retirement. Does this mean you can collect from more then one Federal program but cannot collect from the state and the Federal govt. both?? I have a friend who is a Federal judge and he collects from both and another friend who works for the Va and collects from both–a friend who works for Sandia in New Mexico ditto. l could go on with more names but it makes me upset because I suspect many members of congress collect from both even thou they have only worked for a much shorter time and have a lovely retirement plan.

I just can’t believe my husband worked so hard for so many years and no one can receive his SS benefits. I also remember that at that time no one told all of us hard working students about SS-what a shame. I guess that sometimes life is just not fair.

Thanks for reading this-feels good to just vent once in a awhile.

Sincerely yours,

Connie Auran
1077 Race St Apt 1201
Denver, Colorado, 80206

Meathead
7 years ago
Reply to  Connie Auran

It doesn’t make sense, Connie.

I’m a retired Navy Aviator (October, 1980), receive a military retirement and started drawing SS at age 62 (9 years ago). My wife draws a portion of mine (mine plus hers equals my total if I were single). She was eligible for her portion six-months before I was eligible due to her being six-months older than I am.

My father retired from the state of Florida and drew his state retirement AND SS. My mother drew a portion of his until she died.

Steve
7 years ago

I am a retired state employee, served in the military and also worked in private industry. I paid in social security while in the military and working in private industry. However I was severely penalized when I started drawing social security due to the windfall elimination provision. I am shorted hundreds of dollars each month as a result. I believe if one works extra jobs he should be eligible to receive benefits without penalties. I have called congressional representatives many times and they all indicate there have been bills to repeal this unfair provision, however they will say there are no funds even though Congress is in favor of repealing it and they add it is in committee which evidently is synonymous with the waste basket. I hope that AMAC is looking into this situation as many retirees and future retirees will be affected by this ridiculous law. I would like to know if AMAC is checking into this. Thanks!

Paul
7 years ago
Reply to  Steve

This is terrible. You present a reasonable position and then told there is no funds! Bull Crap — then why do we find funds to give to Egypt, Syria, Iraq, and all the other countries in the Middle East who hate us. We also seem to have funds for free telephones, food stamps, welfare in general – but not for Social Security in which we have all paid into — it’s just a bunch of Crap being passed out my members of Congress and this Administration.

David G Stern
7 years ago
Reply to  Paul

I’m a new AMAC member, tired of AARP’s crap. I think it is up to us to be in touch with all of our representatives and senators and tell them they are going to be voted out unless they start acting
more responsible. It is unfathomable that we can send so much money out of the country, to people
who literally would love us dead, and yet we can’t properly fund Social Security for the people who have worked their entire lives, paying into the system and then being screwed. Sure, I think we have an obligation to support the poor, sick etc. But to just hand out money to people, often in the country illegally,
and deny proper citizens is the kind of thing that breeds revolution. Fortunately, we fight most of our battles at the ballot box instead of bayonets. But the time is here. Otherwise we will become a monarchy, where everyone is depended on the king.

Maybe it’s time to consider one of those one way tickets to Mars!

PaulE
7 years ago
Reply to  Steve

Steve,

The “no funds” justification is merely a smokescreen for the reality that there is no political will in Washington to address this particular issue. Some analyst or lobbyist has no doubt told both parties that there are not enough votes at risk to justify bothering to do any action on this front. That’s how Washington works. If they see a big enough voter block in play, because of a particular issue or subject, then suddenly there are dozens of politicians lining up to co-sponsor legislation to address the issue, All in hopes of landing a majority of those votes. You are correct that “in committee” is usually synonymous with waste basket.

Marta Hedgecorth
7 years ago
Reply to  Steve

I hope they will look into this still because I am a teacher and only get 52$ a month SS. Yes, I have a pension that I paid into and my school district matched. But as a 19 year old student I was making my mind up as to what my profession would be, and as I considered being a teacher, I knew that the pay was very low considering how much education I had and would continue having to get. But when I learned I would have my social security as well as my pension in my retirement years, that I figured would make up for it. I worked 2 jobs making sure my social security quarters and money I was putting into it would add up to have enough upon retirement. I also did summer school which social security was taken out of. Then came the windfall elimination provision. My husband is affected as well. We should at least be grandfathered out, or get a fair percentage with what we put in. My husband’s s.s. was even taken when he was forced to join the military because of Vietnam. But because he is a teacher……that was eliminated. How can anyone plan to be self sufficient if the gov. can’t be trusted to keep what they promise?

Bob Mantei
7 years ago

If all of the politicians were put back on SS, how long would it take them to straighten out that program. Why do we give those politicians what we do when they retire or are voted out of office. I can see giving it to them for a couple of years, to give them time to get a job and get back into the swing of life the rest of are in everyday. They pasted obamacare so they could see what was in it, now let them live with it like all of us have to do.
I have only been paying into SS for 52 years unlike a lot of you, I had no chose in it they took it out of my paycheck, it is not a benefit It is return of the money they took from me. I think it is time to get rid of all of those scam artists in D.C. and get some real leaders in there.
Check your Constitution, there were term limits built into the original Constitution, how many years have they not been following it.

Ivan Berry
7 years ago
Reply to  Bob Mantei

Huh?

PaulE
7 years ago
Reply to  Ivan Berry

Exactly Ivan.

Meathead
7 years ago
Reply to  Bob Mantei

WHERE (Article, Section, Clause) does the Constitution address term limits? I’ve read it many times and pass out pocket editions daily and haven’t read any reference to “term limits” in the Seven Articles and Twenty-seven Amendments.

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