AMAC In The Media / Health & Wellness / Opinion / Politics / Press Releases

Hear Ye America’s Seniors: Get Your Hearing Checked Out, Says AMAC

hearingWASHINGTON, DC, Mar 19 – Too many older Americans – most of us, in fact – suffer from hearing loss.  But the worst thing about this fact is that most seniors are not getting their hearing checked on any regular basis, and too many doctors are not encouraging their older patients to get their hearing checked, according to the Association of Mature American Citizens [AMAC].

Rebecca Weber, CEO of the Association of Mature American Citizens [AMAC], says that as you might expect some 50% of seniors over the age of 75 have hearing loss.  And, she notes, about one-third of those older adults 65 to 70 years of age can’t hear as well as they did when they were younger.

The National Institute on Deafness describes hearing loss as “a sudden or gradual decrease in how well you can hear. It is one of the most common conditions affecting older and elderly adults. Having trouble hearing can make it hard to understand and follow a doctor’s advice, to respond to warnings, and to hear doorbells and alarms. It can also make it hard to enjoy talking with friends and family. All of this can be frustrating, embarrassing, and even dangerous.”

According to a study reported by Newsmax recently, “A national survey of more than 2,000 adults, aged 50 to 80, found that 80% said their primary care doctor hadn’t asked about their hearing in the past two years. Nearly as many said they haven’t had their hearing checked by a professional over the same time period.”

Dr. Michael McKee headed up the study conducted by the University of Michigan’s Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation.  It found that “Hearing loss can occur throughout life, but the risk rises with age as our ears lose function.  Many people don’t realize they’ve lost hearing ability unless they’re screened or tested.”

McKee warns that “Age-related hearing loss can have wide-ranging consequences, and can be addressed with assistive technologies, yet these data show a major gap in detection, and disparities between groups.”

AMAC’s Weber is recommending that seniors citizens have their hearing checked out even if they are not experiencing obvious signs of loss.  “It’s a good thing to find out as soon and as often as need be that your hearing is what it should be at your specific age.”

The Healthy Hearing Website recommends that “Generally, people 60 and older should have a baseline hearing test and get rechecked every few years. (We say “generally” because medical organizations disagree on exactly when an older adult with no symptoms should have their first hearing test, and how often they should get rechecked.) This is to rule out age-related hearing loss.”

We hope you've enjoyed this article. While you're here, we have a small favor to ask...

As we look forward to expanding our work in support of America’s Seniors, we're asking you to consider a gift to help the AMAC Foundation continue to grow.

The AMAC Foundation, a 501(c)(3), plays a vital role in developing resources that enrich America's Seniors' lives. From Social Security to Medicare—with a lot in between—our services have helped thousands of Seniors by providing guidance at a time when they need it most.

Your support of our tax-exempt Foundation will enable us to continue delivering programs that meet a growing community's needs and that are vital to their well-being.

Thank you for putting your faith in AMAC!

Donate Now

If You Enjoy Articles Like This - Subscribe to the AMAC Daily Newsletter
and Download the AMAC News App

Sign Up Today Download

If You Enjoy Articles Like This - Subscribe to the AMAC Daily Newsletter!

Sign Up Today
Read more articles by AMAC, John Grimaldi
Subscribe
Notify of
5 Comments
Newest
Oldest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Nikkismema
6 months ago

I have been tested on 3 different occasions – on the last I decided to ‘go for it’ even tho my hearing results was not all that bad. I was blessed my insurance paid partial ($1600 for me for both ears) but I do not feel that it s made all that much difference. Some people speak very softly or have lower tone of voice so then if I m not looking directly @ them I miss most of what they re saying. Actually what is so sad: due to loud music, etc. very soon more people will have loss of hearing sooner than we older adults now experience.

Sherry
6 months ago

Costco and Sams’s both offer hearing aids at much less than most specialty providers. Their hearing tests are free. I have worn both from a specialty provider and Costco with not difference in quality at a 1/4 of the cost.

Beth
6 months ago

The cost of hearing aids is just unbelievable! The majority of seniors don’t have that much in their budget. Sad that Medicare will cover the hearing test, but won’t cover anything for the hearing aids. Later, the patient will be treated for dementia. It isn’t right.

Patricia Hogan
6 months ago

It is a waste of time to receive a hearing test when Medicare does not cover hearing aids and the cost in the thousands is out of the reach of most seniors.

Rik
6 months ago

My hearing is fine, it’s my eyesight that’s really failing me! … I had just gotten new glasses in November and already I need new glasses. I don’t think these small screen phones help any either.

5
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x